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Novus shows head for heights during manor house roof works /

Novus shows head for heights during manor house roof works
We've carried out essential repairs and maintenance to the roof at a Grade II Listed manor house in Gloucestershire.

The project, which was carried out over a six-week period, also involved essential maintenance works including full external redecoration, re-lining the gutter system, minor timber repairs and sash window overhauls. A complex system of scaffolding was used to protect the steeply-pitched, turreted roof and the historic chimneys at Gloucestershire’s Huntley Manor.
 
The French chateau style house, built in 1862 to a design by Samuel Sanders Teulon, features a distinctive, pointed roof and a large number of chimneys that made the repair work all the more challenging for the team.
 
The distinctive natural slate of the pitched, tiled areas of the mansard roof were of paramount concern as we made improvements to the property, which is owned by Professor Tim Congdon.
 
Liquid roofing products from Belzona were applied to the flat roof areas of the property to increase the integrity and extend the life of the roof, and the house’s rainwater gutter system was completely re-lined using liquid lining products to form a watertight system.
 
Contract supervisor Dave Barnes, said: “The Huntley Manor project was a great opportunity to show how Novus can provide an excellent service. We had many challenges to overcome during the works. We carried out work in phases so we could limit the volume of scaffolding on the premises, and this was one way we could limit the interruptions to the occupants."
 
He added: "We communicated every day with the client to ensure the project ran smoothly, with as little disruption as possible.”
 
Professor Tim Congdon CBE, owner of Huntley Manor, said: “Novus did an excellent job at Huntley Manor. The building is Victorian Gothic, and was designed by the original and adventurous architect, Samuel Teulon, with all sorts of distinctive and awkward period features.

“Novus found the right sub-contractors, made sure that the work was completed on time and to specification, and now – a year later – the building still looks clean and fresh.”
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