Novus passes tenant engagement accreditation with flying colours

  02 APRIL, 2019
Novus passes tenant engagement accreditation with flying colours

We’ve secured one of the UK’s leading certifications for public sector refurbishments as a result of our exceptional client liaison and customer relationship work.

The Tpas accreditation recognises contractors who carry out planned and reactive maintenance works to local authorities and housing associations to the very highest standards.

Tpas is England’s leading tenant engagement organisation, made up of local residents and landlord organisations managing a total of 2.2 million homes around the country. For more information about Tpas read here: https://www.tpas.org.uk/about-tpas

The award is testament to the hard work of our staff who go above and beyond in their communities when it comes to delivering planned and reactive refurbishment projects, whether through picking up shopping for vulnerable residents or hosting skills workshops.

We passed all six sections of the testing criteria. These include ensuring community engagement and customer care is strongly embedded within our team, taking an economically and socially-active approach to community investment and training our employees to be skilled and engaged when dealing with residents.

The accreditation also includes driving success by listening and responding to client and resident concerns, gauging tenant satisfaction and acting upon the findings to improve our services.

Tpas’ overall results concluded that we demonstrated the ability to uphold and deliver on the highest expectations for quality customer care and community engagement.

Kevin Rhone, head of social value and customer service at Novus, said: “Delivering the highest standards possible in customer care is incredibly important to everyone at Novus, but we wanted something that rubberstamps our commitment.

“The Tpas accreditation does that. By passing all the criteria set out by the organisation with flying colours, our staff have yet again shown they’re a cut above when it comes to engaging with our communities.”

SEARCH
RECENT NEWS
payment practices, contractors

DELIVERING ON OUR COMMITMENT TO IMPROVE PAYMENT PRACTICES

Ahead of the filing of our latest payment practice statistics, Neil Washington, our finance director, provides a breakdown of our results. Late payments are a thorn in the side of smaller firms in the construction supply chain. That’s why we have placed an ongoing focus on doing all we can to reduce the time we take to pay our suppliers. Quite rightly, the issue has attracted negative headlines in the construction industry and large companies are now required to report on their payment practices every six months. So, with the deadline for businesses to file their latest available data falling this week, some may be nervous about what the statistics will reveal. Here at Novus, however, we’re happy to report that our commitment to reducing payment times is continuing to bear fruit. The data for the first half of the year shows that we took an average of 29 days to pay our subcontractors. This is an improvement on the already high standard we set ourselves for the same period last year, which was 30 days. To put this in context, according to Construction News’ latest analysis of payment-practice reports, the industry’s largest contractors took an average of 43 days to pay suppliers. It’s not just there where we’ve continued to make improvements. We also now pay 57% of our invoices within 30 days, up from 52% for the first half of 2018, while the proportion of payments outside of terms are down year-on-year. Of course, our work doesn’t stop here and we will continue to focus on this issue. Contractors and their supply chains are dependent on each other’s success. Prompt payment means that subcontractors can maintain healthy cashflow levels, increasing the likelihood of them accepting more work and consistently carrying out quality jobs. Late payment can also have a massive impact on cashflow, increasing the likelihood of insolvency. At a time of skills shortages, reduced access to labour and economic uncertainty, it’s vital that bigger players in the industry are doing all they can to ease the burden smaller firms face.