Investing in school banking project

  13 MARCH, 2017
Investing in school banking project

We've been instrumental in the successful launch of a banking project at a secondary school in Stoke-on-Trent. 

Thistley Hough Academy has opened its own bank with help from ourselves and the Hanley Economic Building Society, to teach students the valuable life skill of managing their own money. We constructed the on-site bank, situated in a disused area of the school, in just five days.

The pupils can open their own Thistley Dollars accounts to manage online, with our chairman Stuart Seddon donating £1 to each student who does so.

We've built up close ties with Thistley Hough and this project is just one of a number of collaborations with the academy as part of our Business Class scheme partnership, which is a national education-focussed initiative driven by Business in the Community, one of the Prince of Wales’ charities.

Sophie Seddon, our marketing manager, said: “Thistley Dollars is a great opportunity for students to not only open a bank account but also learn how to manage money. It’s a crucial step in arming them with financial skills, crucial for when they leave school. We’re delighted to have played such an important role.”

Project co-ordinator Chris Dillon, Thistley Hough’s director of mathematics, said: "Supporting students to develop their understanding of the world of finance is a vital part of our work at the academy.

“The banking project is already proving very popular, with more than 200 of our students already signed up and more accounts opening daily. Novus has played a huge role in the bank’s success and we’re very grateful for its continued support.”

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